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Posts tagged: Storytelling Techniques

PR – International Storytelling retreat in Yellow Springs Ohio for Storytellers, environmental educators or interpretive naturalists.

April 9th-11th, 2010 an eco-teller’s retreat will take place in Yellow Springs, Ohio. Interested storytellers, environmental educators and interpretive naturalists are welcome to attend.

The retreat is open to any person who is currently considers themselves an amateur or professional storyteller, environmental educator or interpretive naturalist. The retreat is organized by Read more »

Nothando Zulu – Participation in Storytelling


Press Play to hear Nothando Zulu speaking on participation on the Art of Storytelling with Brother Wolf.

Press Play to hear Nothando Zulu speaking on participation on the Art of Storytelling with Brother Wolf.

Nothando Zulu on participation.

Nothando Zulu writes..
Participation, Participation, Participation…

I began telling stories as a member of an acting ensemble in 1976, presenting storytelling as a major part of our repertoire. We worked primarily in park and recreation centers and schools. As members moved away or went into other fields, we evolved into – and I co-founded – the Black Storytellers Alliance (BSA) in direct response to the demand for storytelling to deliver the inspirational and cultural lessons embodied in our stories.

Early on I encouraged members of the audience to share the storytelling space by becoming a part of the story and one of the characters in the story. On many occasions, I was unable to use all the audience members who wanted to participate! It was wonderful to have so many trying to Read more »

“Scary Stories are good for your children,” says host of the Art of Storytelling Show.

Eric James Wolf, professional storyteller and host of the Art of Storytelling Show, is available for print, radio and television interviews to speak on how scary stories can be used to teach important life skills to children.

Scary stories and ghost stories have been used for thousand of years to gather interest in young people towards learning a new subject. Eric Wolf says “From ghost stories to strangers giving your child candy; scary stories have been used to help young people identify danger in the world.” Useful scary stories and ghost stories are based on truth, teach valuable skills and leave the audience feeling empowered against the villain or evil of the story.

Eric Wolf host and producer of the Art of Storytelling Show with over 100,000 downloads to date is the longest running, most successful show ever produced dedicated solely to perfecting the art of storytelling.

For more information: Read more »

Zen and the Art of Storytelling Video Series Part 2

Well – see what happens when a summer project turns into a fall release the name of the show has changed. Early release woudl have been better I guess. This is part 2 of the course.

Over the few months I will be releasing the video version of this email course available now on the Art of Storytelling with Brother Wolf Read more »

Anne Glover on Finding Your Authentic Voice in Storytelling


Press Play to hear Anne Glover speak about Finding Your Authentic Voice in Storytelling on the Art of Storytelling.

Press Play to hear Anne Glover speak about Finding Your Authentic Voice in Storytelling on the Art of Storytelling.

Anne Glover storyteller and string lover

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Finding your Authentic Storytelling Voice.

Anne Glover writes….

Here are two things I feel passionately about in storytelling: authentic voice, and connection to the audience. They are closely intertwined. Some people think “authentic voice” means “no character voices.” If you’ve heard my dialogues with the character “Monkey,” you know that I use character voices, particularly for comedic episodes, as Eric learned when he interviewed me. (Have you recovered yet, Eric?) But when I use those other voices, I make a clear distinction in my voice, my brain, and my body between the character and my narrator.

As both a performer and a listener, I prefer a natural voice for the narrator persona. Sometimes as tellers, we think we need to be doing “more.” We alter our voice, add more breath, and drop to a different register, as if “storytelling” required something other than our true selves. It doesn’t. In fact, it demands that each of us bring our true self to the fore, without letting our ego get in the way of the story. This requires that we constantly watch ourselves and our deep intentions, with ferocious honesty.

Sometimes we get so wrapped in the notion that storytelling requires a special voice, that we get in the way of the story. Some people want to know how to “find” their authentic voice. Here’s a technique I like. I might say, for instance, Read more »

Zen and the Art of Storytelling Video Series

Over the Next month I will be releasing the video version of this email course available now on the Art of Storytelling with Brother Wolf Read more »

The August House Book of Scary Stories: Spooky Tales for Telling Out Loud.

Book Review by Brother Wolf.

August House Book of Scary Stories

What an amazing resource! This book is an excellent effective resource for anyone who works with schools, camps, libraries, and just wants to share it on from family book shelves. It is a must for storytellers who intend to tell scary stories to children under fourteen. This anthology of scary stories clearly demonstrates the rich selection of plots and stories that are common in America today. Many of the more traditional stories are provided with slightly different twists. This produces fun to read (or hear) collections for the new storyteller while still holding the interest of those readers (or listeners) who have heard these tales. There are several original stories that are found nowhere else – plus a large selection of the old standbys. Altogether there are twenty stories placed in five categories with four stories per group: Just Deserts, Ghostly Guardians, Dark Humor, Urban Legends and Fearless Females. You are bound to Read more »

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