Category: Scary Storytelling

Kathy Collins – Comedian as Storyteller – Storytelling as Comedy.


Press Play to hear Kathy Collins speak on being a Comedian who tells stories and being a storyteller who uses comedy on the Art of Storytelling with Brother Wolf

Press Play to hear Kathy Collins speak on being a Comedian who tells stories and being a storyteller who uses comedy on the Art of Storytelling with Brother Wolf.

Kathy Collins as Tita

Although I began storytelling as a teenage in high school forensics competitions, I have always felt like an imposter among “real” tellers. I consider myself an actress, one who memorizes lines and portrays characters, as opposed to a wise and wonderful wordsmith. Over years of performing, I’ve become a lot more comfortable with straying from the script and improvising, but it still seemed more like acting than telling. On Maui, I have a greater reputation as a comedienne than a storyteller.

Then I was blessed with the chance to perform this summer at the Lincoln Center Out of Doors Project, where I was billed as one of several poets in the La Casita Festival. Talk about feeling out of my league… now I’m a phony poet too? It seems to me that all poets are storytellers, but not all storytellers are poets. Or are they/we?

Fortunately, this summer I also attended a storytelling festival in Canada’s Northwest Territories. At a tellers’ workshop there, I was surprised to hear Read more »

The August House Book of Scary Stories: Spooky Tales for Telling Out Loud.

Book Review by Brother Wolf.

August House Book of Scary Stories

What an amazing resource! This book is an excellent effective resource for anyone who works with schools, camps, libraries, and just wants to share it on from family book shelves. It is a must for storytellers who intend to tell scary stories to children under fourteen. This anthology of scary stories clearly demonstrates the rich selection of plots and stories that are common in America today. Many of the more traditional stories are provided with slightly different twists. This produces fun to read (or hear) collections for the new storyteller while still holding the interest of those readers (or listeners) who have heard these tales. There are several original stories that are found nowhere else – plus a large selection of the old standbys. Altogether there are twenty stories placed in five categories with four stories per group: Just Deserts, Ghostly Guardians, Dark Humor, Urban Legends and Fearless Females. You are bound to Read more »

Janice M. Del Negro – Revising Feminist Folk-tales: Naming the Women.


Press Play to hear Janice M. Del Negro  who was interviewed by Eric Wolf on revising feminist folk-tales: naming the women. on the Art of Storytelling.

Press Play to hear Janice M. Del Negro who was interviewed by Eric Wolf on revising feminist folk-tales: naming the women. on the Art of Storytelling with Brother Wolf.

Dr. Janice M. Del Negro  speaks on revising feminist folk-tales: naming the women. on the Art of Storytelling with Podcast.

Dr. Janice M. Del Negro writes
When Eric and I talked about a topic for this interview, he asked me what was I passionate about? I am passionate about naming the women.

That being said, I was reluctant to use the word “feminist” in the title of this podcast. The word “feminist” is a trigger word that elicits, in many people, a strong emotional response. Since I agree with Mark Twain – “the difference between the right word and the almost-right word is the difference between the lightning and the lightning-bug”- the choice of the word “feminist” was problematic, because nearly everyone has a distinct personal definition of that particular word. Eric bypassed that concern, however: “people will search ‘feminist’ online,” he said to the library school professor. So here we are, “Revisioning the Feminist Folktale,” and I am not sure that two people on the planet have the same definition of what “feminist” means, never mind folktale, or oral tradition. So I’ll stick to passion.

I am passionate about retelling folktales. I am passionate about excavating old tales, tales that have already survived for centuries, for emotional truths that resonate with contemporary listeners. There is no definitive version of a folktale, no “original”; we can point to Read more »

Speaking out in Defense of Scary Stories on the Art of Storytelling with Brother Wolf Show

Saturday, October 25, 2008
For Immediate Release
Contact: Eric James Wolf
Phone: (937) 767-869
Speaking out in Defense of Scary Stories on the Art of Storytelling with Brother Wolf Show

Eric James Wolf, professional storyteller and host of the Art of Storytelling with Brother Wolf Show, is available for print, radio and television interviews to defend the use of the scary Halloween stories in the oral tradition with children.

Scary Halloween stories and ghost stories for children have taken the place of ritual trials of adulthood for teenagers, according to Mr. Wolf. They also serve as a means for adults to warn children away from dangerous places or behavior. Ghost stories and scary Halloween stories in the oral tradition can be age appropriate and satisfying for families. Currently on his the Art of Storytelling shows website he has five interviews available for easy download about the art of telling scary Halloween stories.

Eric Wolf does not condone or support horror or the graphic use of violence. “It is possible, however, by carefully working within the confines of scary Halloween stories and ghost stories for children, to leave our audience psychologically stronger and more emotionally capable of dealing with their fears or the shock of real world disasters,” Mr. Wolf says.

# Read more »

Donna Washington – The Anatomy of a Ghost Story

Fill out the form and press play to hear Donna Washington professional storyteller and featured ghost storyteller at the 2008 National Storytelling Festival. speaks about the Anatomy of a Ghost Story on the Art of Storytelling with Brother Wolf.

Donna Washington professional storyteller and featured ghost story teller at the 2008 National Storytelling Festival.

Tired of the tin sound?
Purchase a HQ Mp3 File of
Interview #063
Donna Washington
Logo for art of storytelling
for $2.23
The Anatomy of a Scary Story

Donna Washington Writes…
Why do kids love ghost stories? I asked my eleven year old son this question because I have discovered that my academic and empirical observations about these sorts of subjects often bears little resemblance to the actual answer. He was good enough to inform me that he loves the fact that the characters are frightened and they have no idea what is about to happen next. He didn’t say word one about wanting to be scared. In other words, it’s the idea of the scary thing being someplace far away from you so that you can have a good scare in a safe place and then walk away and be all right. Just for the record, that’s what I thought. In other words, I agree with the expert.

http://www.donnawashington.com

Memoirs of being a Honolulu Ghost Tour Guide with Lopaka Kapanui

Fill out the form and press play to hear Lopaka Kapanui as he speaks on memoirs of being a Honolulu Ghost Tour Guide on the Art of Storytelling with Brother Wolf.


Lopaka Kapanui professional storyteller and ghost story teller at the 2008 Talk Story Storytelling Festival in Hawaii.

Tired of the tin sound?
Purchase a HQ Mp3 File of
Interview #065 Lopaka Kapanui
Logo for art of storytelling
for $2.23
Memoirs of being a Honolulu Ghost Tour Guide.

Most valued Family, Friends and Fans,

The Mysteries of Honolulu experience does involve the otherworldly and the supernatural. But it also explores the great mysterious essence in our own lives. It explores the wonder and privilege of being born and the mystery that has eluded man for centuries, where our final hours on this earthly plane are concerned.

More often than not, the road I travel in order to take people to that pinnacle is a rough and rugged one but at it’s conclusion is the spiritual Shangri-La that we all seek; the sustenance of the immortal ambrosia. The unique quality of this experience is that it is presented to all of you from the aspect of the Hawaiian culture while it also lends a keen insight to the belief systems of other local cultures as well.

Please join me and become a part of this great experience as we all, together, explore the Mysteries of Honolulu and this great mystery called life.

Mahalo Piha,

Lopaka Kekaikunanea’opele Kapanui

More about Lopaka Kapanui

Native Hawaiian, Lopaka Kapanui, has been described by many as one of Hawaii’s foremost storytellers. Following in the footsteps of his close friend and mentor, Obake Tales author, Glen Grant, he shares more than just Hawaiian ghost stories, he shares his knowledge of Oahu and Hawaii. Through his tours and activities, he weaves the tales of Old Hawaii with a passion and a mystery you won’t soon forget.

Myths of Hawaii and its gods and goddesses, legends of spirits and demigods, stories of mystery and hauntings… let Lopaka show you a glimpse of his world, where the “paranormal” becomes the norm.

To learn more about Lopaka’s work visit his website at: http://www.mysteriesofhonolulu.com/

Get the Inside Track on Storytelling…

Would you like to be a part of a storytelling conference call that supports you in your use of storytelling? If so, then enter your name and email address and you will receive personal invitations to participate in The Art of Storytelling with Brother Wolf Conference call or anything else about the show…

Name:
Email:
Share your thoughts on the call, connect with old time storytellers and ask questions to experts in the field.

I will not share or give away your email address.

And don’t forget to subscribe by iTunes or your browser to the Art of Storytelling Podcast so you can get bi-weekly inspirations from Brother Wolf direct to your desktop.

WordPress Themes