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Posts Tagged Southern Storytelling

Dylan Pritchett – What Makes a Great Storyteller?

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to hear Dylan Pritchett speak on what makes a great storyteller on the Art of Storytelling with Brother Wolf.

Dylan Pritchet telling stories

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What Makes a Great Storyteller?

Bio
Dylan Pritchett is a native of Williamsburg, Virginia. Since 1990, Mr. Pritchett has been a full-time storyteller, taking his African and African-American folk tales averaging over a hundred schools annually throughout the country. He enjoys an twelve-year, professional association with the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, where he performs and leads workshops for teachers on using storytelling in the classroom. Drawing on his experience in historical research, he has created two Read the rest of this entry »

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Grandaddy Junebug – Mitch Capel – Poetry and Storytelling

Fill out the form and press play to hear Granddady Junebug aka Mitch Capel speak on poetry and storytelling on the Art of Storytelling with Brother Wolf.

Granddady Junebug - Mitch Capel - Poetry and Storytelling

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Grandaddy Junebug writes…
Good storytelling is like poetry to your ears…good poetry is storytelling at it’s best. Storytelling and poetry go together like hand in glove. Ninety percent of the stories I tell are in rhyme so I coined the term “sto’etry” to describe my unique style of telling.

At the tender age of three, my paternal Grandmother read to me the story poem
“A Cabin Tale” from the “Life And Works Of Paul Laurence Dunbar”. The genius of this work coupled with the joy in my Grandmother’s eyes and the passion in her delivery left an indelible impression in my heart. Since 1985 I have been performing the works of Dunbar, myself and others at festivals, schools and other venues throughout the United States.

Storytellers in general are unaware of the vast potential poetry can add not only to the repertoire of the teller but, also to the “flavor” of the performance. This is especially true with venues for children. A vast majority of young audiences are familiar with the “Rap” genre of music and are, therefore, more inclined to not only enjoy the performance with greater appreciation but also to digest more of the content of the morals and affirmations. “Sto’etry” is “Rap” without the music with each child supplying his or her own “beat” to the vocals, which, in turn actually seems to garner more satisfaction as one seems to “enjoy the book more than the movie”. Older audience members are also appreciative of this style because most, in their youth, were taught the values of poetry and the importance of memorizing and reciting for different groups within their respective communities.

Come with me as we explore the unlimited possibilities poetry can add not only to storytellers, but, to story listeners as well.

Most storytellers shy away from utilizing poetry in performance because of the need to “memorize” verbatim as well as the inability to “ad lib” during the show. It is true that poetry lends itself to a certain rhythm, however, once you’ve crawled into the skin of the poet your voice becomes the vehicle and your words become the steering wheel that guides the listeners (travelers) on the journey. A good storyteller wouldn’t have any problem “playing” to an audience or “ad libbing” while utilizing the “sto’etry” style of telling. Read the rest of this entry »

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Donna Washington – The Anatomy of a Ghost Story

Fill out the form and press play to hear Donna Washington professional storyteller and featured ghost storyteller at the 2008 National Storytelling Festival. speaks about the Anatomy of a Ghost Story on the Art of Storytelling with Brother Wolf.

Donna Washington professional storyteller and featured ghost story teller at the 2008 National Storytelling Festival.

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The Anatomy of a Scary Story

Donna Washington Writes…
Why do kids love ghost stories? I asked my eleven year old son this question because I have discovered that my academic and empirical observations about these sorts of subjects often bears little resemblance to the actual answer. He was good enough to inform me that he loves the fact that the characters are frightened and they have no idea what is about to happen next. He didn’t say word one about wanting to be scared. In other words, it’s the idea of the scary thing being someplace far away from you so that you can have a good scare in a safe place and then walk away and be all right. Just for the record, that’s what I thought. In other words, I agree with the expert.

http://www.donnawashington.com

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Thomas Freeze – Why tell Children Scary Ghost Stories?


Play to hear this interview that was recorded as a conference call on September 24th at 8 PM ET - 2008.  Thomas Freeze spike about the advantages of sharing ghost stories with children.

Play to hear this interview that was recorded as a conference call on September 24th at 8 PM ET – 2008. Thomas Freeze spike about the advantages of sharing ghost stories with children.

Thomas Freese writes…
I enjoyied being on Eric’s “Art of Storytelling with Brother Wolf Podcast” on September 23, 8PM Eastern time. I’ve been a professional storyteller and author of ghost story books for over a decade in addition to my work as an art therapist and licensed professional counselor. Our topic was “Why tell children scary ghost stories?” I have over a dozen storytelling programs that I perform for schools, libraries, festivals, churches and private parties. And several of those themed programs are ghost stories. I’ve collected both true ghost stories as well as authoring original fiction mysteries. Kids love storytelling and kids really love ghost stories!

Grave Stones photo curtsey of Storyteller Thomas Freeze - Ghost storytelling included

I was fascinated with ghost stories since I was a middle school student. In fact, one of my favorite books, Strangely Enough, which I bought at a Scholastic Book Fair, is still in print and still available for kids at school. After reading it and questioning my Mom about Read the rest of this entry »

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The National Storytelling Conference of 2008 – Panel on the Future of Storytelling Online.


Press Play to hear this interview that was recorded as a conference panel presentation at the National Storytelling Conference on Friday, August 8th, 2008 at  11 am ET - 2008.  The Future of Storytelling Online from left to right Brother Wolf as moderator, Panel members Rachel Hedman, Robert Kikuchi-yngojo, Mary Margaret O'Connor and Fred Crowe off picture to the right.

Press Play to hear this interview that was recorded as a conference panel presentation at the National Storytelling Conference on Friday, August 8th, 2008 at 11 am ET – 2008. The Future of Storytelling Online from left to right Brother Wolf as moderator, Panel members Rachel Hedman, Robert Kikuchi-yngojo, Mary Margaret O’Connor and Fred Crowe off picture to the right.

National Storytelling Conference in 2008 on the future of storytelling online

Here is a brief bio on each participant.

Robert Kikuchi-Yngojo was the co-founder, along with his wife Nancy Wang of Eth-Noh-Tec. For the past 26 years they’ve created, performed, and re-synthesized ancient Asian mythologies and folk tales. As a storyteller Robert also performs solo, traveling nationwide working with national chapters of Young Audiences and other agencies. Lesser known, are his accolades in the Asian American music scene. He has recently launched Eth-Noh-Tec’s new podcast: “Once A Pod A Time”.

Karen Chace is a storyteller, web researcher and director of a student storytelling troupe. She is the author of Story By Story – Building A Student Storytelling Club, contributed to the NSN publications, A Beginner’s Guide to Storytelling, Telling Stories to Children and writes the Stor-e Telling column for Storytelling Magazine. She maintains a amazing website of resources at http://www.storybug.net

Rachel Hedman (http://www.rachelhedman.com) is a fusion of energy who takes everyday events, discovers the adventure behind them, and shares the stories with everyone. From sophomore high school youth teller to BYU Storytelling Club founder, she now serves as Co-Chair for the Youth, Educators, and Storytellers Alliance. She spearheads approval of the Boy Scouts of America storytelling merit badge. She posts semi-monthly on her blog ” Voice – A Storyteller’s Lifestyle” at http://storytellingadventures.blogspot.com.

Mary Margaret O’Connor is the founder of iTales.com. Mary Margaret lives in Irvine, California and runs a pharmaceutical marketing consulting company. She is married with two kids. Despite this being her first visit to the beautiful Great Smokey Mountains, she couldn’t quite get inspired enough for yesterday’s 5am Pacific Time hike!

Eric Wolf is a children’s storyteller and host of the Art of Storytelling with Brother Wolf. Eric Wolf has a M.S. from Lesley University, apprenticed with Storyteller David Elhya in 1993. He writes on his experience as a dyslexic storyteller on his personal blog www.dyslexicstoryteller.blogspot.com/.

Bio’s Above ———–
National Storytelling Conference in 2008 on the future of storytelling online
————- Offers Below

Eth-Noh-Tec will be leading several cultural delegations to Asia: India 2008, China 2009, Singapore and Korea in subsequent years. This Fall, from Oct 31 through Nov 16, 2008, join them as they explore the storytelling in the oral and musical traditions of Chennai, India. There is room for their fall tour. Contact them: at there website www.ethnohtec.org or call: 415-282-8705.

Karen Chace has a four page handout available for you today. However, you may also receive it via email attachment. All of the URL’s will be hyperlinked for your convenience so you just have to point and click! Simply email Karen at storybug@aol.com with the subject heading “NSN Panel Offer.”

Be one of the first five people to post a comment to one of Rachel Hedman’s blog entries (http://storytellingadventures.blogspot.com), share feedback on the entry, and request for a one-hour free consultation call with her about your blog. All other people who respond are welcome to get quick tips by email – info@rachelhedman.com.

iTales would like to offer storytellers to go to www.iTales.com and sign up to sell your story. In return, we will host and assist in the global marketing of your story.

Eric Wolf invites you to listen to his podcasts at http://www.artofstorytellingshow.com where you will be able to hear the complete recording of this panel in about month or www.fairytalesforever.com where there are 20+ stories online for easy listening. If you are interested in podcasting as possible venture please signup to his free e-course on Art Centered Podcasting at: http://www.artofstorytellingshow.com/podcast/

National Storytelling Conference in 2008 on the future of storytelling online

Eric Wolf Speaking during the podcast….

Thanks again to Fred Cowe for dropping in on such short notice….
http://www.artofstorytellingshow.com

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Jeff Gere’s Tour of Georgia, Tennessee and Florida.

Jeff Gere festival organizer and professional storyteller telling a scary story.

Written by Jeff Gere… March 9- April 2, 2008

BRIEFLY: I had a BLAST in an exhausting collage of faces and places starting with Atlanta, Kennesaw (curriculum mixes drama and storytelling) with Irish teller Eddie Lenihan. Then up through the Smokey Mountains: Cleveland, Knoxville, and Jonesborough (SUCH A LITTLE TOWN!) Connie Gil hosted me. Met with NSN (Bobbie) and ISC (Susan/ Jimmy Neil) about a national story radio show. I did a workshop & tell there, then did lotsa ghost tours with my daughter in Savannah, and caught my breath at her house in Jacksonville, Florida. Then a wonderfully intense long weekend at the Florida Storytelling Camp and home on one of the last ATA flights. Read the rest of this entry »

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Talking about humor with Buck P Creacy.

Fill out the form and press play to hear humorist and storyteller Buck P. Creacy speak about what makes storytelling funny on the Art of Storytelling with Brother Wolf.

Storyteller ad Humorist Buck P.Creacy teachers us how to make people laugh.

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What makes stuff funny in storytelling?

Who Is Buck P. Creacy?
Buck P. Creacy is a homegrown Humorist and a Storyteller.
But that is hardly an adequate description of this very funny man. Buck P. has always used humor to make life better for those around him. In the process you can tell he has gained a passion for life and people himself.

He started his humor apprenticeship in Slim’s Barber Shop, Farmington New Mexico, at the tender age of 14. There he realized he could shine more shoes and get bigger tips, if he made his customers laugh. He is still putting a shine in peoples eyes and making them laugh.

Buck P. is also a real live “honest to God” Toolmaker,
with nearly 30 years in the tool room, working, consulting and teaching for the benefit of companies all over America. Sharing his wit and wisdom with some of the best known international companies in the world such as Toyota, Dresser Corp., Osram Sylvania and the list goes on and on for more than 98 companies. Groups both large and small love him.

Today his focus on humor is as razor sharp as ever,
but never malicious. He has chosen early in life to make his humor “safe” for any audience. Whether his audience is a group of first year students or industry team members or a family reunions, he manages to bridge the gaps with easy grace.

Buck P. sees the whole wide world just a little bit different.
And that difference is enough just enough to make you laugh out loud.

To Learn more about Buck P. Creacy check out hisi site.

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