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Posts tagged: Arts in Schools

Bill Lepp – How to Lie and not get Caught.

If you are looking for Bil Lepp’s Website please go to it at http://www.leppstorytelling.com


Press Play to hear Bil Lepp who was interviewed by Eric Wolf on How to Lie and not get Caught on the Art of Storytelling with Brother Wolf.

Press Play to hear Bil Lepp who was interviewed by Eric Wolf on How to Lie and not get Caught on the Art of Storytelling with Brother Wolf.

Storyteller - Bill Lepp speaking on how he solved world hunger during his recording session on the Art of Storytelling with Brother Wolf.

Bio:
Bil Lepp is a nationally renowned storyteller and five time champion of the West Virginia Liars’ Contest. His outrageous, humorous tall-tales and witty stories have earned the appreciation of listeners of all ages and from all walks of life. From elementary school to veterans’ homes, from churches to colleges, from festivals to formal dinners. Though a champion liar, his hilarious, insightful stories often contain morsels of truth which shed light on subjects such as politics, religion, death, relationships, and human nature. An award winning storyteller, author, and recording artist, Lepp’s release, The Teacher in the Patriotic Bathing Suit, received the Parent’s Choice Approved award, and Mayhem Dressed as an Eight Point Buck won a 2008 NAPPA Honors award. Lepp has been featured at the National Storytelling Festival, the Smithsonian Folklife Festival and at major storytelling and corporate events across the country. Says Bill, Everywhere I Read more »

Andy Offutt Irwin – Entertaining children with out boring the grownups out of their skull.


Press Play to hear Andy Offutt Irwin who was interviewed by Eric Wolf on entertaining children with out boring the grownups out of their skull on the Art of Storytelling on Tuesday, Dec. 16th at 8pm.

Press Play to hear Andy Offutt Irwin who was interviewed by Eric Wolf on entertaining children with out boring the grownups out of their skull on the Art of Storytelling on Tuesday, Dec. 16th at 8pm.

Andy Offutt Irwin speaks on the Art of Storytelling with Brother Wolf on how to entertain children with out boring the grownups out of their skull.

Bio

A native of Covington, GA, Andy started out in comedy, but added music and storytelling because he had a lot more to say. In storytelling circles,he is especially known for relating the adventures of his eighty-five-year-old aunt,Marguerite Van Camp, M.D. He’s always on the go, performing at festivals, theatres and schools throughout the United States, including two gigs as a Featured Teller at the National Storytelling Festival, where in 2008 he will perform a solo concert at the Midnight Cabaret.

He has been a Teller in Residence at International Storytelling Center; a Guest Artist at La Guardia High School of Art, Music, and Performing Arts in New York (The “FAME!” School); and he has been a Keynote Speaker/Performer at the Library of Congress-Virburnum Foundation Conference on Family Literacy. He is an award winning recording artist with five titles and growing.

Andy used to have real jobs: from 1991 to 2007 he was Artist-In-Residence in Theatre at Oxford College of Emory University. He spent five years writing, directing and performing with the comedy improv troupe, SAK Theatre at Walt Disney World. But he’s had lots of more interesting life experience-type employment, including – but not limited to – actor, camp counselor, political satirist, youth director, janitor, deputy voter registrar, theatre orchestra conductor, garbage man, teacher, carpenter’s flunky, and bullfrog tadpole catcher (Honest).

You can learn about Andy Offutt Irwin’s current work at his website http://www.andyirwin.com.

Storytelling and the Development of Ethical Behavior with Elizabeth Ellis


Press Play to hear Elizabeth Ellis who was interviewed by Eric Wolf on the relationship between Storytelling and the Development of Ethical Behavior on the Art of Storytelling with Brother Wolf on Wednesday, Dec. 3 at 8pm.

Press play to hear Elizabeth Ellis who was interviewed by Eric Wolf on the relationship between Storytelling and the Development of Ethical Behavior on the Art of Storytelling with Brother Wolf on Wednesday, Dec. 3 at 8pm.

Elizabeth Ellis storyteller kissing a frog while storytelling for children.

Elizabeth Ellis Writes…
If I had a nickel for every time someone
(attorney, state trooper, loan officer, IRS agent) has made fun of me because I told ‘em I am a storyteller, I could take us all out to dinner. At a nice place. With tablecloths. Because often the public perception of storytelling is that it is fluff and foolishness.
Well, we storytellers know better, and we have survived an entire movement of Back to the Basics and Almighty State Testing. What the left brain-ers don’t realize is there is another entire level of education far more basic to being human than the 3 R’s will ever be.
The most basic things about being human come from the right side of the brain, not the left. Chief among them is the ability to make ethical decisions. I am not talking about Read more »

Grandaddy Junebug – Mitch Capel – Poetry and Storytelling

Fill out the form and press play to hear Granddady Junebug aka Mitch Capel speak on poetry and storytelling on the Art of Storytelling with Brother Wolf.

Granddady Junebug - Mitch Capel - Poetry and Storytelling

Tired of the tin sound? Purchase a HQ Mp3 File of Interview #067 Mitch Capel Grandaddy June Bug
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for $2.23 Poetry and Storytelling

Grandaddy Junebug writes…
Good storytelling is like poetry to your ears…good poetry is storytelling at it’s best. Storytelling and poetry go together like hand in glove. Ninety percent of the stories I tell are in rhyme so I coined the term “sto’etry” to describe my unique style of telling.

At the tender age of three, my paternal Grandmother read to me the story poem
“A Cabin Tale” from the “Life And Works Of Paul Laurence Dunbar”. The genius of this work coupled with the joy in my Grandmother’s eyes and the passion in her delivery left an indelible impression in my heart. Since 1985 I have been performing the works of Dunbar, myself and others at festivals, schools and other venues throughout the United States.

Storytellers in general are unaware of the vast potential poetry can add not only to the repertoire of the teller but, also to the “flavor” of the performance. This is especially true with venues for children. A vast majority of young audiences are familiar with the “Rap” genre of music and are, therefore, more inclined to not only enjoy the performance with greater appreciation but also to digest more of the content of the morals and affirmations. “Sto’etry” is “Rap” without the music with each child supplying his or her own “beat” to the vocals, which, in turn actually seems to garner more satisfaction as one seems to “enjoy the book more than the movie”. Older audience members are also appreciative of this style because most, in their youth, were taught the values of poetry and the importance of memorizing and reciting for different groups within their respective communities.

Come with me as we explore the unlimited possibilities poetry can add not only to storytellers, but, to story listeners as well.

Most storytellers shy away from utilizing poetry in performance because of the need to “memorize” verbatim as well as the inability to “ad lib” during the show. It is true that poetry lends itself to a certain rhythm, however, once you’ve crawled into the skin of the poet your voice becomes the vehicle and your words become the steering wheel that guides the listeners (travelers) on the journey. A good storyteller wouldn’t have any problem “playing” to an audience or “ad libbing” while utilizing the “sto’etry” style of telling. Read more »

Literacy and Storytelling in the 21st Century with Michael D. McCarty

Fill out the form and press play to hear Michael D. McCarty speak on literacy and storytelling in the 21st Century this interview on the Art of Storytelling with Brother Wolf.

Micheal D. McCarty Storyteller speaking to a High-school about the Art of Storytelling and Literacy.

Tired of the tin sound?
Purchase a HQ Mp3 File of
Interview #066
Michael D. McCarty
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for $2.23
Storytelling and literacy in the 21st century.

Michael D. McCarty writes…
That which does not evolve dies. The ability to change, grow and adapt is essential to the survival of any species, society or ideal. Storytelling has been around since the dawn of man, which says a lot for the viability of this essential art form. Throughout human history stories have been used to inform, inspire, educate and more. Storytelling is part of our DNA.
So what is the role of literacy and storytelling in the 21st century?
How is it evolving? The National Storytelling Network’s Storytelling Interest Groups (SIGs) give an indication. Storytelling has Read more »

Donna Washington – The Anatomy of a Ghost Story

Fill out the form and press play to hear Donna Washington professional storyteller and featured ghost storyteller at the 2008 National Storytelling Festival. speaks about the Anatomy of a Ghost Story on the Art of Storytelling with Brother Wolf.

Donna Washington professional storyteller and featured ghost story teller at the 2008 National Storytelling Festival.

Tired of the tin sound?
Purchase a HQ Mp3 File of
Interview #063
Donna Washington
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for $2.23
The Anatomy of a Scary Story

Donna Washington Writes…
Why do kids love ghost stories? I asked my eleven year old son this question because I have discovered that my academic and empirical observations about these sorts of subjects often bears little resemblance to the actual answer. He was good enough to inform me that he loves the fact that the characters are frightened and they have no idea what is about to happen next. He didn’t say word one about wanting to be scared. In other words, it’s the idea of the scary thing being someplace far away from you so that you can have a good scare in a safe place and then walk away and be all right. Just for the record, that’s what I thought. In other words, I agree with the expert.

http://www.donnawashington.com

Jim May – Storytelling in Classrooms and Schools

Jim May speaking on storytelling
Press Play to hear Jim May speaking on storytelling on the Art of Storytelling with Brother Wolf.
Press Play to hear Jim May speaking on storytelling on the Art of Storytelling with Brother Wolf.

Jim May Writes…
I tell stories to children because I learned many years ago that nothing in my ten years of experience as a classroom teacher held my elementary student’s attention like a story.

For some twenty-three years now, I have made my living as a professional, full time storyteller. That storytelling produces a singular, intensely vital experience in my listener’s imagination continues to be reinforced nearly every day of my professional storytelling life.

I remember a particular occasion telling stories
to an auditorium full of primary-aged students (grades k-2). After the program was finished, the students filed past the front of the Read more »

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