Category: Magical Child

Odds Bodkin – Storytelling in the Bardic Tradition

Odds Bodkin Bard and Storyteller Press Play to hear Odds Bokin speak on Storytelling in the Bardic Tradition on the Art of Storytelling with Brother Wolf.

Press Play to hear Odds Bokin speak on Storytelling in the Bardic Tradition on the Art of Storytelling with Brother Wolf.

Odds Bodkin Writes…
Bardic storytelling–that is, spoken words with live music–is a tradition that dates back to Homer and more deeply into almost all
shamanic traditions. Homer plucked a lyre, scholars believe, and recited The Iliad and The Odyssey with character voices. Shamanic traditions have used music with spoken narrative to transport audiences ever since local history and the religious impulse demanded human expression. Read more »

An Audience of One

girl
Photo Credit D Sharon Pruitt

Back when I was an aspiring actor in New York City, fresh out of conservatory and performing in showcase productions in out-of-the-way, off-off-off-off-Broadway theaters, we had a rule — understood if not clearly spoken: call off the performance if the actors outnumber the audience. (Unless of course there happened to be a casting agent in the house.) I remember a particular production of Richard III (yes, think Richard Dreyfuss in The Goodbye Girl?) when the cast of fifteen put the policy to the test on numerous occasions.

Whether or not we cancelled shows (I don’t think the producer was in on the compact), the principle is clear. Don’t squander your talents on less-than-ample audiences. Or, more pointedly: what if you put on a show and nobody comes? Read more »

Romanian Storytelling Camp

Editors note: The following post was written and submitted too me for the blog after regular listener Mihaela Blaga, a librarian from Romania, wrote me a very nice email describing her work and her success using storytelling as the focus of a retreat in her native county. B. W.

Romanianwebstorycamp08

Hi Eric and readers of the Art of Storytelling Blog,

For me this first storytelling camp was a wonderful experience and also a dream that became reality…..
I decided to have a really entertaining program for this camp, so that it would be special for the children, a really story camp. We had trips, stories, fire camp, parties and of course we played a lot with the sleighs in the snow.
During the three days of camp, we had four storytelling workshops.

I started the “program of stories” with a beautiful one about forgiveness and about what it means to have a good heart full of love and friendship instead of hate or anger, and so, I gave a Read more »

Octavia Sexton – The Jack Story a Traditional Tale for Everyone.


Press Play to hear Octavia Sexton talk about Jack Story and how this traditional tale belongs to everyone. on the Art of Storytelling with Brother Wolf.

Press Play to hear Octavia Sexton talk about Jack Story and how this traditional tale belongs to everyone on the Art of Storytelling with Brother Wolf Show.

Octavia Sexton 2010

Octavia Sexton writes…
I think most people probably know that a Jack Tale is a trickster story and Jack. They’ve been around for over 800 years – originating in the British Isles. The stories came to North America via European settlers. The stories told in the Appalachian Mountains began to change through the years to reflect the environment and cultural traditions that emerged among the mountain people.

I grew up in a storytelling tradition and stories were a part of life. I heard a variety of stories not only through kinfolk but also at school. I went to a one-room school and the only thing to do at recess was sing songs, tell stories and play games that did not require ‘stuff.’ We didn’t have any ‘stuff’ to play with because we were all just a bunch of poor country kids. I think I established myself very early as a storyteller. I remember being 5 years old and standing on a big rock in the yard of one of my uncles’ houses and telling tales to my cousins, aunts and uncles who gathered on the big front porch. We had all kinds of stories, but I never knew what a Jack Tale was until I went to college.

After eighth grade, Mommy asked me if I wanted to get married or go on to high school.
I went on to Read more »

Ruth Stotter – Working with Props (and string) in Storytelling.


Press Play to hear Ruth Stotter speak on working with props in storytelling performances on the Art of Storytelling with Brother Wolf.

Press Play to hear Ruth Stotter speak on working with props in storytelling performances on the Art of Storytelling with Brother Wolf.
(Link was broken NOW fixed - sorry about that.)

ruth storyteller

Ruth Stotter Writes….
I love the idea that as a storyteller, you travel light. A “bag” of stories takes up no room and is easy to carry around. But I also love interspersing stories with props – both as a folklorist carrying on old traditions and as a way of adding a visual component. Puppets, masks, and origami are among my favorites. You asked why I am currently so intrigued with string stories Read more »

Fairytales Forever Storytelling Series – Six hours of Storytelling…

Fairytales Forever

Brother Wolf will perform his storytelling epic over a six week period at Pass It on Kids starting on Wednesday, the 21st of April.

The first six hours of Brother Wolf’s seven hours of the storytelling epic, “Fairy tales Forever,”will be performed at Pass it On Kid’s over the next six Wednesdays starting on the 21st of April at 3:15 PM. Each performance is one hour long.

Fairy tales Forever is a continuous oral narrative modeled after 1001 Arabian nights where one story ties together a range of traditional fairy tales. In this case the stories are inspired by the modern European Fairy tales, the Brothers Grimm and many other well traveled stories. Brother Wolf (Eric Wolf) has been working on this series of stories for the past fifteen years. Read more »

Nothando Zulu – Participation in Storytelling


Press Play to hear Nothando Zulu speaking on participation on the Art of Storytelling with Brother Wolf.

Press Play to hear Nothando Zulu speaking on participation on the Art of Storytelling with Brother Wolf.

Nothando Zulu on participation.

Nothando Zulu writes..
Participation, Participation, Participation…

I began telling stories as a member of an acting ensemble in 1976, presenting storytelling as a major part of our repertoire. We worked primarily in park and recreation centers and schools. As members moved away or went into other fields, we evolved into – and I co-founded – the Black Storytellers Alliance (BSA) in direct response to the demand for storytelling to deliver the inspirational and cultural lessons embodied in our stories.

Early on I encouraged members of the audience to share the storytelling space by becoming a part of the story and one of the characters in the story. On many occasions, I was unable to use all the audience members who wanted to participate! It was wonderful to have so many trying to Read more »

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